Compliance with Global Formaldehyde Emission Standards

All materials meet the highest Japanese and European Emission Standards.

AMOCC maintains a strict criteria when selecting materials

 

Here at AMOCC, we are very particular with the materials that we choose to work with. All of the products we work with clear Japan’s and Europe’s highest standard (F****/SE0). For a full comparison chart, please see this webpage.

Applicable to Products Delivered within Japan

Where Japanese Standard Building Laws applyFurniture ClassificationMaterial ClassificationAMOCC's Formaldehyde Level Allowance
Not regulatedPlace Furniture (such as that sold in stores):

Tables, chairs, desks, cabinets, consoles, TV stands, etc.
Solid WoodF***/E0 grade.
RegulatedInstallation FurnitureMedium Density Fibreboard (MDF), Plywood, ParticleboardF***/E0 grade.
Solid WoodF****/SE0 grade adhesives only.
PlywoodF****/SE0 grade.
MDFF****/SE0 grade.
Particle BoardF****/SE0 grade.

Applicable to products delivered to countries excepting Japan

Where Japanese Standard Building Laws applyFurniture ClassificationMaterial ClassificationAMOCC's Formaldehyde Level Allowance
Not regulatedPlace Furniture (such as that sold in stores):

Tables, chairs, desks, cabinets, consoles, TV stands, etc.
Solid WoodF****/SE0 grade adhesives only.
RegulatedInstallation FurnitureSolid WoodF****/SE0 grade adhesives only.
PlywoodF****/SE0 grade
MDFF****/SE0 grade
Particle BoardF****/SE0 grade

Regarding the procurement of F4-grade materials in Vietnam, as of December 2015

 

All plywood received and used has been F4 certified by the JAS or JIS. While not readily available in Vietnam, F****/SE0 grade plywood, MDF, and particle board is imported to Vietnam independently.

What is ‘formaldehyde’?

Formaldehyde is a naturally-occurring chemical compound which is often found in industrial resins and which is often used in furniture development. These resins are used in different types of building materials like particle board and certain types of coatings and in the adhesive in wallpaper.

Recently, concerns over the use of formaldehyde in furniture manufacturing processes have been linked to a range of symptoms and health concerns.

Formaldehyde will slowly dissipate into the air from furniture and building materials over time. Once oxidized, it can cause people in close proximity to feel nauseous, to experience eye and throat irritation, or even to feel short of breath.

How have Japanese laws responded to this?

The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare released a set of guidelines in the year 2000 pertaining to formaldehyde concentrations in indoor settings. Their recommendation was that concentration indoors be under 0.08ppm (less than 100μg/m3 released in a 30 minute time span in a room of 20-23 degrees Celsius) being desired for health conditions.

In addition to this, the Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and Transportation also launched a housing performance index system in the year 2000 which set strict guidelines for formaldehyde use in new houses being built. This was further amended in 2003 with additional restrictions being applied to interior finishing materials and required mandatory ventilation equipment/systems be installed in all new buildings.

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